Goldeneye in Waldwick

Duck +golden+eyed+and+ring+necked+wald+2+15+19+DSC_0995_crop
In case you missed her post on the Fyke email list, Barbara Dilger writes:

Today I stopped by White's Pond in Waldwick to see if there were any interesting ducks on the water.  One fellow was mixed in and blending well with the ring-necked ducks.
 
It took me a few moments to realize this one looked a little different.  He was on the other side of the pond, so I drove over there to see if I could get some closer shots.
 
By the time I got over there, of course, he was back closer to the other side. 
 
I did this a few times, but was outsmarted each time.  I did get some shots for ID, and this is the first time I have seen this one in Waldwick.
 
There were also Common and Hooded Mergs.
 
(Thanks, Mrs. D!)

Birdy 30 Starts Today!

IMG_9781
In conjunction with the Great Backyard Bird Count, Stiles Thomas and I are doing a Birdy 30 this weekend, and you're invited to join us.

For those unfamiliar with the free contest, here’s what you do: Just look out your home or office window for 30 minutes straight between today (Feb. 15) and Monday (Feb. 18), count the number of bird species you see, and then send your best 30-minute bird list to me by 3 p.m. next Tuesday.

The Birdy 30 is on the honor system, so please don’t get creative with your sightings. And if you see something unusual, please take a photo. I’d love to share them.

With the Birdy 30, you can pick a convenient time and window, have a cup of coffee, and chill.

Need to make a phone call or text somebody? No worries. Rainy or snowing? Try later. Skunked? Make sure your feeders are full and try again.

Rule No.1: Have fun.

If you need an inducement, there's a First Prize if you like: A copy of the Celery Farm book, In the Presence of Nature.

"Best Bird" Prize: Your choice of Duck Enough to Fly, Icky or Swan Babies.


Sundogs at the the Celery Farm

IMG_1476
Earlier today, I posted photos I took at the Celery Farm in which there appeared to be a smaller ghost sun -- including one that was green (above, lower left corner).

I recalled the phenomenon was called a sundog , created by thesun's light refracting through ice crystals in the atmosphere.

More on sundogs, sun pillars and sun halos here.
IMG_1478



Monday Morning Mystery Answered

IMG_1439Last week I asked what kind of crustacean was crawling around a fort in Old Sn Juan.

I also wrote that I figured a bird must have carried it there since these guys don't handle steps well.

Jennifer Browning and Julie McCall both said it was a Hermit Crab. (Thanks!)

Julie added: 

Coenobita clypeatus - a Caribbean hermit crab, often referred to as a purple pincher among hobbyists.

This one's pretty lucky for two reasons: 1. it actually found a shell to fit it. The number of shells being harvested in the wild to sell has an impact on hermit crabs! 2. it's in the wild.

Pretty much *EVERY* land hermit crab you see in captivity is taken from the wild. it is so incredibly difficult to breed them in captivity and have the offspring survive, that the pet trade exclusively sells kidnapped hermit crabs. Land hermit crabs are better off in the wild!!

Also, I can attest that their climbing abilities are very very impressive, and that crab probably did climb up on its own. they can climb up the inside of a glass tank if they use the corners.

I learn something new every day, and have a long way to go ... Below is a shot of the crab in hermit mode. Bottom is a shot of the fort itself.

IMG_1440

IMG_1445

 


The Birdy 30 Is Back!

IMG_9781
In conjunction with the Great Backyard Bird Count, Stiles Thomas and I are doing a Birdy 30 this weekend, and you're invited to join us.

For those unfamiliar with the free contest, here’s what you do: Just look out your home or office window for 30 minutes straight between Friday (Feb. 15) and Monday (Feb. 18), count the number of bird species you see, and then send your best 30-minute bird list to me by 3 p.m. next Tuesday.

The Birdy 30 is on the honor system, so please don’t get creative with your sightings. And if you see something unusual, please take a photo. I’d love to share them.

With the Birdy 30, you can pick a convenient time and window, have a cup of coffee, and chill.

Need to make a phone call or text somebody? No worries. Rainy or snowing? Try later. Skunked? Make sure your feeders are full and try again.

Rule No.1: Have fun.

First Prize: A copy of the Celery Farm book.

"Best Bird" Prize: Your choice of Duck Enough to Fly, Icky or Swan Babies.


Amazing Bird Cam Footage

As you know, the Duke Farms Eagle Cam isn't the only game in town.

You can see avian activity worldwide these days thanks to webcams.

The trouble is, if you look at any of the cams at any given moment, there's a good chance that nothing much is happening.

That's why the Cornell Ornithology Lab's new compilation of the best webcam footage from last year is so enjoyable. Might check it out, especially if you're stuck at home because of the bad weather in the forecast.

See how many if the birds you can ID.


Great Eagle Show on Duke Farms' Cam

Checked out the Duke Farms Eagle Cam this a.m. and saw both adults working on the nest.

I rewound the action and learned that one eagle arrived around 6:34 (my guess is it was perched nearby) and the other arrived around 6:41. 

It's getting near egg-laying season... (Just click the red arrow above to watch the cam.)

You can read my free interactive Duke Farms Bald Eagle e-book here.