BCAS Talk: Kayaking Kearny Marsh

RS F 001 AAA IMG_9020My friend Ron Shields, the dean of Meadowlands photography, is doing a talk and slide show about photographing the Kearny Marsh by kayak.

Ron's presentation will take you on a photographic journey through the Kearny Marsh and the Saw Mill Creek Wildlife Conservation Area during the spring, summer and fall of 2017. All
images were taken from the unique perspective of a kayak in some of the most challenging and remote areas of this region. 

Ron Shields has been photographing the wonders of this area for the past ten years spending most of that time on the water.

His contributions include images for the books “The Nature of the Meadowlands” and “Bald Eagles in the Meadowlands & Beyond,” myriad posts to The Meadowlands Nature Blog, and numerous presentations throughout North Jersey.

Chapter business meeting at 7:30 with program immediately thereafter.   

Meetings are free and open to public and held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20 Puffin Way, Teaneck.


The Sounds of Buttermilk Falls, Part 2

One of my favorite places in winter is High Mountain in nearby Passaic County, especially just after a snowstorm when the snow is beginning to melt.

I put together this video of the sights and sounds of Buttermilk Falls off the Red Trail not far from the Reservoir Drive trail head in North Haledon.

Still can't beat that soothing sound of a waterfall.

The Nature Conservancy works with Wayne Township, the New Jersey Natural Land Trust and the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference on this 1,260-acre nature preserve.

More about High Mountain here.


The Sounds of Buttermilk Falls, Part 1


One of my favorite places in winter is High Mountain in nearby Passaic County, especially just after a snowstorm when the snow is beginning to melt.

I put together this video of the sights and sounds of Buttermilk Falls near Franklin Clove, at the end of Scioto Drive today.

Just can't beat that soothing sound of a waterfall.

I will post a similar video of the other Buttermilk Falls in High Mountain Park Preserve -- the one off Reservoir Drive -- on Tuesday.

The Nature Conservancy works with Wayne Township,  the New Jersey Natural Land Trust and  the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference on this 1,260-acre nature preserve.

More about High Mountain here.


Quick-thinking Shot of Red-tail

IMG-9309
What do you do when you're walking around the Celery Farm and see a Red-tail eating his dinner, but you don't have a camera with a telephoto lens?

A friend, Yousif Almasri, decided to use his smartphone and a pair of binoculars.

I thought that was pretty cool, and something to file away for the future.


Allendale's Crestwood Park

Screen Shot 2018-02-14 at 4.47.40 PM
One of my new places to bird (and walk) is Allendale's Crestwood Park (most locals just call it Crestwood Lake). 

Right now I'm seeing Red-tails and Song Sparrows and a few Northern Cardinals, Modos, etc., but I figure it'll pick up as the weather warms. Killdeer, anyone? They nest here in the spring.

The lake itself is currently drained, and Pipits and Wilson's Snipes have been seen on the lake bed last fall, along with a Clay-colored Sparrow on the lawn.


When Will Our First Killdeer Arrive?

IMG-6905
Stiles Thomas reported a Red-winged Blackbird in his yard on Tuesday, and I saw posts about an early spring on Jersey Birds today, which got me to thinking...

When and where will the first Allendale sighting of a Killdeer be in 2018?

I'm guessing Crestwood Lake (above), early March.

How about you.

A free "Duck Enough to Fly" to whoever gets the first photos.

More about this under-birded spot soon.

By the way, I heard a Red-winged Blackbird in the Celery Farm at dusk last night. That is the sound of spring to me.

 


History of (the) Tuxedo

Tuxedo cartoon (1)
Kay Yeomans of the Northwest Bergen History Coalition passed along this fascinating old cartoon about the origin of the tuxedo.

Note the first illustrated panel. I know that the Lenape who lived near the present-day Celery Farm called the area "Wolf Swamp," in the days before it became Fell's Meadow. Same tribe most likely. Perhaps the swamp was named for them and not the four-legged mammal.

Kay also recommended a Town & Country magazine story on the history of Tuxedo Park, here.

(Thanks, Kay!)

A link to my earlier post on Tuxedo Park is here.